7th July 2022

ULCCI

United Liberal Catholic Churches International

Year B

Daily Readings for Tuesday July 13, 2021

Prayer

God of hosts, before whom David danced and sang, 
Mother of mercy and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, 
in whom all things cohere: 
whenever we are confronted by 
lust, hate, or fear, 
give us the faith of John the baptizer, 
that we may trust in the redemption of your Messiah. Amen.

Psalm 68:24-35

Awesome is God in the sanctuary

Your solemn processions are seen, O God,
the processions of my God, my King, into the sanctuary –
the singers in front, the musicians last,
between them girls playing tambourines:
“Bless God in the great congregation,
the Lord, O you who are of Israel’s fountain!”

There is Benjamin, the least of them, in the lead,
the princes of Judah in a body,
the princes of Zebulun, the princes of Naphtali.

Summon your might, O God;
show your strength, O God, as you have done for us before.

Because of your temple at Jerusalem
kings bear gifts to you.

Rebuke the wild animals that live among the reeds,
the herd of bulls with the calves of the peoples.

Trample under foot those who lust after tribute;
scatter the peoples who delight in war.

Let bronze be brought from Egypt;
let Ethiopia hasten to stretch out its hands to God.

Sing to God, O kingdoms of the earth;
sing praises to the Lord,  Selah

O rider in the heavens, the ancient heavens;
listen, he sends out his voice, his mighty voice.

Ascribe power to God,
whose majesty is over Israel;
and whose power is in the skies.

Awesome is God in his sanctuary,
the God of Israel;
he gives power and strength to his people.

Blessed be God!

2 Samuel 3:12-16

David claims his wife Michal

Abner sent messengers to David at Hebron, saying, “To whom does the land belong? Make your covenant with me, and I will give you my support to bring all Israel over to you.” He said, “Good; I will make a covenant with you. But one thing I require of you: you shall never appear in my presence unless you bring Saul’s daughter Michal when you come to see me.” Then David sent messengers to Saul’s son Ishbaal, saying, “Give me my wife Michal, to whom I became engaged at the price of one hundred foreskins of the Philistines.” Ishbaal sent and took her from her husband Paltiel the son of Laish. But her husband went with her, weeping as he walked behind her all the way to Bahurim. Then Abner said to him, “Go back home!” So he went back.

Acts 23:12-35

Plot to kill Paul

In the morning the Jews joined in a conspiracy and bound themselves by an oath neither to eat nor drink until they had killed Paul. There were more than forty who joined in this conspiracy. They went to the chief priests and elders and said, “We have strictly bound ourselves by an oath to taste no food until we have killed Paul. Now then, you and the council must notify the tribune to bring him down to you, on the pretext that you want to make a more thorough examination of his case. And we are ready to do away with him before he arrives.”

Now the son of Paul’s sister heard about the ambush; so he went and gained entrance to the barracks and told Paul. Paul called one of the centurions and said, “Take this young man to the tribune, for he has something to report to him.” So he took him, brought him to the tribune, and said, “The prisoner Paul called me and asked me to bring this young man to you; he has something to tell you.” The tribune took him by the hand, drew him aside privately, and asked, “What is it that you have to report to me?” He answered, “The Jews have agreed to ask you to bring Paul down to the council tomorrow, as though they were going to inquire more thoroughly into his case. But do not be persuaded by them, for more than forty of their men are lying in ambush for him. They have bound themselves by an oath neither to eat nor drink until they kill him. They are ready now and are waiting for your consent.” So the tribune dismissed the young man, ordering him, “Tell no one that you have informed me of this.”

Then he summoned two of the centurions and said, “Get ready to leave by nine o’clock tonight for Caesarea with two hundred soldiers, seventy horsemen, and two hundred spearmen. Also provide mounts for Paul to ride, and take him safely to Felix the governor.” He wrote a letter to this effect:

“Claudius Lysias to his Excellency the governor Felix, greetings. This man was seized by the Jews and was about to be killed by them, but when I had learned that he was a Roman citizen, I came with the guard and rescued him. Since I wanted to know the charge for which they accused him, I had him brought to their council. I found that he was accused concerning questions of their law, but was charged with nothing deserving death or imprisonment. When I was informed that there would be a plot against the man, I sent him to you at once, ordering his accusers also to state before you what they have against him.”

So the soldiers, according to their instructions, took Paul and brought him during the night to Antipatris. The next day they let the horsemen go on with him, while they returned to the barracks. When they came to Caesarea and delivered the letter to the governor, they presented Paul also before him. On reading the letter, he asked what province he belonged to, and when he learned that he was from Cilicia, he said, “I will give you a hearing when your accusers arrive.” Then he ordered that he be kept under guard in Herod’s headquarters.